Potential of IoT & Open Data on Display at IoT Civic Hack

“They’re coming.”

I remember the conversation in late February with Bill Soards, the President of AT&T Indiana, breaking the good news that the AT&T Developer Program was finally descending upon Central Indiana. The resulting hack would endeavor to mix internet of things (IoT) technology and open data related to Indiana’s growing illegal drug problem.

State Rep. Ben Smaltz and President of AT&T Indiana Bill Soards discuss technology's role in combating drug abuse at IoT Civic Hack.
State Rep. Ben Smaltz and President of AT&T Indiana Bill Soards discuss technology’s role in combating drug abuse at IoT Civic Hack.

For starters, it meant a global leader in Smart City technology was dropping into our backyard and bringing with them a whole host of IoT gadgets to play with. For public sector agencies and community organizations, it offered an exciting opportunity to develop new tools to fight drug abuse. For the Brigade, it was a chance to bring disparate communities of technologists, first responders, and public sector agencies together to combat a significant problem.

Fast forward to this past weekend when over 150 developers, designers, data scientists, and engineers flooded into Launch Fishers, Indiana’s newest and largest coworking space. The results of the nearly 30 hour hack ranged from a predictability model designed to reduce ambulance response time to a facial recognition system connected to a criminal database.

The new Launch Fishers provided a perfect backdrop for teams during the IoT Civic Hack.
The new Launch Fishers provided the backdrop for teams during the IoT Civic Hack.

Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provided data on over 70,000 ambulance runs spanning the past five years. “It was great to see a group of civic minded people helping to think outside the box when it comes to the health and safety of our community,” said Tom Arkins with Indy EMS. “It is this type of cooperation and ingenuity which solves problems.”

Tom Arkins, Chief of IT and Informatics with Indianapolis EMS, talks 911 data with a team at IoT Civic Hack.
Tom Arkins, Chief of IT and Informatics with Indianapolis EMS, talks 911 data with a team at IoT Civic Hack.

State Representative Ben Smaltz, whose northeastern Indiana district has been hit hard by methamphetamine, spoke at the hack and made an impassioned plea for new technology to help law enforcement. “I was enormously impressed with the event and the people who participated,” said Smaltz. “I can’t tell you how grateful I am for everyone who made an effort to help the kids impacted by meth labs. When people put their minds together to solve a problem, nothing can stop them.”

Winning submissions included:

o 1st Best App Overall– Community1 – A solution that allows the security camera at the door of a private residence or business to easily search criminal databases and warn of potential threats. A programed Raspberry Pi 3 sends live video footage to a server, which uses a facial recognition API and local criminal database.

The team from Community1 presents their facial recognition solution.
The team from Community1 presents their facial recognition solution.

o 2nd Best App Overall – Park Explorer – This app gives citizens real-time insights into activity at local parks to help them decide where to go. It also gives the public the ability to provide feedback about the current conditions and report safety concerns. Park directors are supplied with actionable data about how many people are visiting parks, and a way to interact directly with park goers.

o 1st Best Open Data Solution – 911 Analytics – This solution is a 911 ambulance recommendation system. Using data analytics, priority 911 caller zones and dispatch codes are identified. The resulting smart ambulance network improves the average distance between caller and ambulance by 20 percent.

The team from 911 Analytics took top prize for an open data solution.
The team from 911 Analytics took top prize for an open data solution.

o 2nd Best Open Data Solution – Crime Cast – Crime Cast uses law enforcement data to show areas of high crime rate in a heatmap. This serves to help predict and target high-risk crime areas for certain conditions.

o Best Use of M2X – Smart Bin – By leveraging IoT to bring big data insights to waste disposal, SmartBins is a after-market WiFi sensor installed on residential and commercial garbage collection bins. The solution gives waste disposal companies and cities the ability to make better use of resources and increase customer satisfaction.

 


Matt Kirby
matt@openindybrigade.com
@indkirby